Tips on What Not to Do During your Diet


We all know that when we start a new diet it can really be a test of our self control. If you’re trying to lose weight with a latest diet craze, there are things you must keep in mind to avoid getting off track with your plans:
  • don’t just wear baggy clothes until you have reached your desired weight
  • when you wear clothes which are too big it can cut down your motivation, you might feel encouraged to give up on the diet.
  • don’t forget to wear clothing that makes you feel your best no matter what weight you are at
  • don’t go to the grocery store before eating 
  • don’t sabotage your diet by going to a place where all of the bad foods tempting you on an empty stomach
  • schedule your shopping when you are less vulnerable
  • don’t get rid of your favorite foods, diets almost always backfire when the dieters are stuck eating boring, tasteless food; they start missing their favorite dishes 
  • use creativity and those cooking skills you have to remake some of the foods you like but still adhering to the diet’s standards
  • don’t make a bunch of drastic changes that will just shock your system during the first week
  • watching their calories and altering their routine makes most people anxious and irritability sets in
  • wanting to comfort yourself with food could hurt your weight loss goals
  • ease yourself into a new diet taking small steps to keep yourself from feeling overwhelmed. You will be much happier in the long run
  • don’t skip meals even if you think you are going to go over your daily calorie goals; when you skip a meal you will start to feel hungrier than usual; you will do much better by consuming small meals during the day to maintain your energy
  • don’t tell everyone and their brother that you are dieting; telling everyone your plans could motivate in some cases, but it is unwise to put that kind of pressure on yourself
  • don’t share your plans until the dieting is part your normal routine
  • don’t expect results in just a few days; it takes time to get your metabolism in the proper mode to start reducing your weight; it will take some time to start to see any significant differences until at least three weeks
  • don’t skip your food journal; keeping a daily record of your intake will make you more aware of your eating habits; chances are you will have a better chance of sticking to your diet
  • don’t stock up on food; get into the habit of not having food around where you relax or work
  • don’t get into the habit of constant snacking even if it is all healthy food you want to make sure that you handle an oral fixation with food
Sticking to your new diet will be easier if you have a strategy. Use these very helpful tips from http://www.weightshapes.com/ to help strategize your diet success.

Wine Info


Wine informations

Just Some of The Things I Learned at Rose Cottage


  • how to hug people and not feel awkward, but comfortable and connected instead
  • candles and fake-fur coats don't mix
  • blogging is addictive, satisfying and hilarious
  • there are people in the world who will care about you, listen to you, and defend you, even if they don't really know you, or have only just met you
  • how to make origami stars
  • just because someones energy rubs you the wrong way, or clashes with yours, doesn't mean they are a bad person - or that you are a bad person... and it doesn't mean you can't come to like them, or even care deeply for them
  • sometimes it's enough just to show up and be
  • a group of women of all ages, from 20 to 60, can sit together and have hilarious, dirty conversations filled with sexual innuendo and filthy humour - and have so much fun with each other, just talking about rubbish
  • howling at the moon is a great energy release
  • neighbours will call the police about noise after 10.30 pm 
  • teachers are just as much students as their pupils
  • some things just don't need to be said out loud
  • it's possible for their to be so much conversation and laughter in a small room that you can't hear the person right next to you
  • sometimes it doesn't matter
  • everyone has their cross to bear - and the people you least expect can sometimes be the most fragile of all
  • i lived in Atlantis
  • it's possible to snort and be dignified at the same time
  • there are people in the world brave enough to approach you before they've even met you to say they feel a connection with you
  • how to mix watercolour paints
  • incense can never not smell glorious
  • the most seemingly mundane objects can have profound meaning and be as sacred as anything else
  • there is such a thing as "way too much information" (usually after you've already said it)
  • but it doesn't happen very often
  • striped socks rock!
  • how to anoint candles
  • more women don't wear bras than you'd think - and no one really notices or cares
  • friendships can bounce back from even the most seemingly unforgivable situation
  • 'moon water' can have an effect like champagne (not naming any names here, Shann)
  • judgment backed by ignorance is not my problem, and it's only up to me if i let it become my problem
  • deep down, we are all a bit of a fluffy bunny :)
  • reiki is a gift - i will forever see it as such, and i will forever love, respect and feel gratitude for the person who passed this gift to me, and for bringing it into my life when i couldn't afford to do it anywhere else
  • how to belly dance
  • 'by donation' is a wonderful thing, but sometimes, we just need to buy toilet paper
  • it's okay that some of the most important people in your life are the one's you don't see face to face very often - it's about so much more than that
  • how to love
  • how to accept
  • how to tolerate
  • how to be open
  • how to release the fear of judgment, disapproval and ignorance
  • how to touch and be touched and feel safe
  • how to look into someones eyes and have them look into yours and not freak out or lose yourself
  • how to laugh without feeling self-conscious
  • how to create a personal bubble that actually works
  • how to draw myself inwards from negativity and other's distress so that i can show compassion and caring, but not take on the pain as my own
  • how to love even the people you don't like
  • how to trust my intuition when it comes to first impressions
  • how to forgive
  • how to trust
  • how to accidentally set fire to a dead bird

St. Clair Vicar’s Choice Pinot Noir (2004)


Pinot Noir is a love it or leave it grape, and I’m a sucker for a good, affordable Pinot. On my last trip to a certain wine store, I must have been sending off subliminal Pinot-craving waves. A certain employee there (let’s call him the Doctor) picked up on my mood and intercepted me on my way to the staff picks section. Intrigued (and having a lot of respect for his impeccable taste), I followed him to the New Zealand corner of the store. Stopping at the border between New Zealand and South Africa, the good Doctor pointed at the St. Clair Vicar’s Choice Pinot Noir (2004 vintage). A true bargain and a veritable steal for $16.99, he said. It is difficult indeed to find a good Pinot for under $20, he added, sinking the hook in deeper. I thought about it, but decided that it was more than I wanted to spend. He saw the indecision in my eyes and swayed me by adding that the store had only received ten cases, and two were already sold. That did it. With some trepidation, I took the Stelvin-closed bottle home and opened it. He was right. This is an excellent wine.


It was clean, crisp, and slightly acidic. Packed with bright (almost sweet) cherry fruit, it also showed a long finish and a hint of tannic goodness make this darn near perfect. And for under $20, it’s even better. My wife loved it, and pronounced it her second favourite New Zealand wine of the year (after the Spy Valley Sauvignon Blanc she savored last weekend). It is a textbook example of a well-made Pinot Noir. But I felt it was missing something. It was almost too perfect. It was like hearing a Canadian Idol contestant from the Prairies covering an old Motown classic. Technically perfect, yes, but not my style. I don’t like my Pinots to be so clean and polite. I prefer it when they come swaggering up from the wrong side of the tracks, smoking a joint, wearing a tattered old Circle Jerks t-shirt and spitting on the sidewalk. So while I must complement the folks at St. Clair for their very fine Pinot Noir, it’s not for me. Give me the smoky, dirty Mission Hill ‘Five Vineyards’ Pinot Noir any day. Or roll out the funky French carpet and send some fine Burgundy my way. Give me any Pinot that isn't afraid to let it's inner funk hang out (as long as the inner funk doesn’t remind me of an overripe durian fruit). But save the almost-too-perfect Pinot Noirs for someone else...

One Word Wines


Following the decline in wines named after animals, it seems like the new trend is wines with one word in the title. Short, catchy and easy to remember, they dont yet have the baggage carried by their annoyingly cute competitors. Im tired of penguins and bears crawling across my sideboard and its time for something new. So this post is my tribute to some of the best one-word wines Ive enjoyed lately: Zed Sauvignon Blanc (New Zealand - $12.40 @ the MLCC). Being a contrary kind of person, I think Ill start at the end of the alphabet. Zed (made by Montana Wines) is a new Sauvignon Blanc from New Zealand. (Zed. Zealand. Very cute). Its well-priced (especially for a Kiwi wine), well-made, has a neat label, a catchy name and its sure to be a success this summer. And its really good too, even if it aint no Fish Hoek. Loads of lemons, herbs and melon on the nose and in the mouth, with softer fruit than you typically find in a Kiwi Sauv. Its got the zippy acidity so common to this part of the world, but its not overwhelming, and is a great introduction to New Zealand at a good price. 

Bloom Riesling (Mosel-Saar-Ruwer - $13.99 @ DeLucas). Like many other people in the wine world, Im a sucker for a good Riesling. Especially at this time of the year. Spring just seems tailor-made for crisp, light white wines. Bloom has a beautifully floral nose (almost like lilacs) with some mineral overtones. Having recently moved eleven yards of gravel around my backyard, Id say that it has a hint of gravel to it. But since I didnt wear a dust mask, everything has a hint of gravel these days. In the mouth, its a classic German Riesling. Loads of peaches, more flowers, some sweetness and lots of acidity to balance it off. Its as close to perfection as youll find from Germany for under $15. We served it up with a selection of fine Indian dishes from Ivory and it went well with everything, and was even better the next day. And I love the marketing. My biggest problem with German wines is the labels. Ive learned to figure them out, but Ive seen people walk away from some beautiful German wines just because they cant decipher the labels. Dr. Loosen (maker of the fabulous Dr. L Riesling) gets it, and so do the folks at Bloom. Marketing is key when there are such a wide selection of good Rieslings to choose from. So kudos to the folks at DeLucas. Im glad they took a chance and brought this one in. Theres also a Muller-Thurgau from the same folks with a similarly-catchy one word name, which (strangely enough) runs for $15. I havent tried it yet, but I cant imagine it being better than the Bloom.

Avalon Cabernet Sauvignon (California - $18 @ Kenaston Wine Market). One of the few downsides to living in Canada (aside from the weather) is that American wines are really expensive. I travel to the States pretty regularly, and its hard going to Minneapolis and finding wines for $7 or $8 (US) that you cant find for under $20 at home. Having said that, the Avalon Cabernet Sauvignon is a great value for $18 (Canadian). Avalon Winery focuses on making fine Cabernets. They have a California bottling and a Napa Valley bottling. Both are fantastic, but only one is a "one-word wine". Ill cover the Napa Valley bottling another day. I think they are also connected in some way to the folks who make Rock Rabbit (Syrah and Sauvignon Blanc) and Mark West (Pinot and Chardonnay). Suffice to say that the name may be short but the wine is not. Lots of beautiful berry, plum and chocolate flavours shine through here, and are wrapped around a core of soft and tasty tannins. Youll even pick a little hint of the dustiness that I've found in great Napa wines (although this is mostly sourced from Central and North Coast fruit). For $18, its a great California wine. And the companion Avalon Napa Valley Cabernet Sauvignon is an even better value for $25.

Lindeman’s Bin 35 Rosé


A dependable dry rosé for the summertime is a very good thing. I enjoy white wine, but sometime I just crave the richness of flavour found in red wines. And the blistering heat and humidity of summer are not a friendly match with bigger red wines. That’s where rosés come into the picture. The drier they are, the more they will satisfy your red wine cravings, without being too overwhelming (try a big Cabernet outdoors in mid-July and you’ll see what I mean). Judging by my experience yesterday, I think the Lindeman’s Bin 35 will be a frequent visitor to my fridge this summer. I’ve passed this one up a few times in the past, but after spending most of the weekend on yard work, I was craving a cold glass of wine. The rest of the wines in the Lindeman’s Bin series are usually good, so I decided to give the Bin 35 a try. Not to pat myself on the back or anything, but it was a pretty good move on my part. Made from Grenache and Shiraz, this wine packs a lot of flavour into the glass. It’s a bit darker than most rosés I’ve come across lately, and the nose has a lot of sweet fruit (cherry for the most part). But it’s soft and dry in the mouth, with more fruit (cherries again and some raspberries) and a little hint of spice. I had this by itself, but it would be a great match with BBQ chicken, grilled salmon or even home-made burgers. As a bonus, it’s on sale at the MLCC for $9.99 right now. Stock up for the summer, it’s worth it.